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Our Security Accreditations & Certificates

LPCB EXPLAINED

The Loss Prevention Certification Board (LPCB) is the leading international Certification Body in the fields of security and fire protection. LPCB approval is recognised by governments and regulatory authorities across the world, especially in the Asia-Pacific, Middle East and Europe.

The LPCB approval process involves assessment and testing of products to ensure that they meet quality standards set by a team of experts who may be regulators, insurers, designers, manufacturers, installers, engineers and scientists. Approval of products is usually based on testing undertaken by the LPCB’s world-renowned testing laboratories. This approval is maintained by regular audits to ensure that the product continues to meet the approval criteria.

LPS 1175 SECURITY RATINGS EXPLAINED

Many building materials including plasterboard, brick, block, steel cladding etc., can be breached in a surprisingly short period of time.

The LPS 1175 test stipulates the allowable toolset and minimum time at each security rating level to prevent forcible entry through a building element.

In the case of a modular building, the test measures the time to make a hole big enough to get a person through (minimum of an elliptical shape 400mm x 225mm) and also looks at all the joints and fixing to the building environment as appropriate. The tests are carried out by the Building Research establishment (BRE) – who have full knowledge of the product and its construction. Many initial trials are carried out to assess the best tools to use from the allowable toolset.

Ratings will be indicated in ‘as built’ drawings and certified by the independent LPCB ISO9001 audit process.

These rating will generally be rated SR1-5. Please see below for a description of what each rating will protect you against:

  • SR1: Opportunist attack by bodily force using minimal tools (e.g. screwdriver, knife, pliers, etc)
  • SR2: More determined opportunist attack with tools of a higher mechanical advantage (e.g. SR1 tools plus bolt cutters, claw hammer, drill, etc).
  • SR3: Deliberate forced entry of protected premises using bodily force and a selection of attack options (e.g. SR2 tools plus short axe, chisels, crowbar, gas torch, etc).
  • SR4: Experience attempts at forced entry with higher tool levels (e.g. SR3 tools plus felling axe, sledgehammer, steel wedges, disc grinder, jigsaw, etc).
  • SR5: Serious attempts at forced entry with top end battery power tools used by fire and rescue teams (e.g. SR4 tools plus circular saw and the awesome 750W reciprocating saw with specialist blades).

STS202 EXPLAINED

Many building materials including plasterboard, brick, block, steel cladding etc., can be breached in a surprisingly short period of time.

The STS202 test stipulates the allowable toolset and minimum time at each security rating level to prevent forcible entry through a building element.

In the case of a modular building, the test measures the time to make a hole big enough to get a person through and also looks at all the joints and fixing to the building environment as appropriate. The tests are carried out by Exova– who have full knowledge of the product and its construction. Many initial trials are carried out to assess the best tools to use from the allowable toolset.

These ratings will generally be rated BR1-6. Please see below for a description of what each rating will protect you against:

Resistance Class (BR)

BR1 – Method to gain entry: The casual burglar attempts to gain entry using small simple tools and using physical violence, e.g. kicking, shoulder charging, lifting or tearing. The casual burglar attempts to gain entry using small simple tools and using physical violence, e.g. kicking, shoulder charging, lifting or tearing. The burglar attempts to take advantage of opportunities, and has no knowledge of the resistance of the construction or likely reward. (Lower Risk)

BR2 – Method to gain entry: The casual burglar attempts to gain entry using small simple tools such as screwdriver, pliers, wedges and with grilles and exposed hardware a small handsaw. Power tools are not associated with this level of burglary. The burglar attempts to take advantage of opportunities, and has no knowledge of the resistance of the construction or likely reward and is concerned with both time and noise and is willing to take only low risk. (Lower Risk)

BR3 – Method to gain entry: The burglar attempts to gain entry using a crow bar, an additional screwdriver and hand tools such as a hammer, punches and mechanical drilling tools. At this level the burglar attempts to increase the force applied to gain entry and with the drilling tool the burglar can attempt to attack vulnerable locking devices. The burglar has some knowledge of the likely resistance, but is still concerned with both the time and noise (MEDIUM RISK)

BR4 – Method to gain entry: The practised burglar uses in addition, a heavy hammer, axe, chisels and a portable battery powered drill. The tools used at this level allow the burglar to increase the number of attack methods. The burglar has knowledge of the likely reward, and will be resolute in his effort to gain entry, he is less concerned with either the time or noise and is prepared to take a medium level of risk.
(MEDIUM RISK)

BR5 – Method to gain entry: The experienced burglar uses in addition, electric tools, drills, jig and sabre blades and angle grinder. The tools used at this level again allow the burglar to further increase the attack methods. The burglar anticipates a reasonable reward, and is resolute in his effort to gain entry and is well organised, he has little concern with either the time or noise level and is prepared to take a high level of risk. (HIGH RISK)

BR6 – Method to gain entry: The experienced burglar uses in addition, spalling hammers, power electric tools e.g. drills, jig and sabre blades and angle grinder. The tools are used by a single person, and have a high level of performance and are very effective. The burglar anticipates a good level of reward, and is resolute in his effort to gain entry and is well organised, he has no concern with either the time or noise level and is prepared to take a high level of risk.
(HIGH RISK)

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LPS1175 AND SRS202

The difference between the accreditations is merely the two agencies that test them (BRE & Exova). Both are well-recognised 3rd parties who test the products using similar methods and against similar strains. In this way, you may find the only real difference is in the pricing.

CE MARKING EXPLAINED

CE marking is a key indicator of a product’s compliance with EU legislation and enables the free movement of products within the European market. By affixing the CE marking on a product, a manufacturer is stating their conformity with all of the legal requirements to achieve CE marking and therefore ensuring validity for that product to be sold throughout the EEA, the 27 member states of the EU and European Free Trade Association countries.

CE marking does not indicate that a product was made in the EEA, but merely states that the product has been assessed before being placed on the market and thus satisfies the legislative requirements, such as a high level level of safety, to be sold there. It means that the manufacturer has verified that the product complies with all relevant essential requirements, such as health and safety necessities, of the applicable directive(s) or, if stipulated in the directive(s), had it examined by a notified conformity assessment body.

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